Sustainable forest management

Book Presentation: Trees of Life – Our Forests in Peril

What we do to earth we do to ourselves - What we do to our forests we do to ourselves!

Notes of the Author

My concerns are international and my book compares the wisdom our Native American culture developed about the details of nature to the values our western culture places on nature. Our indigenous people lived with nature and were required to understand the complexity and detail of their surroundings to survive. 34 years of experience with the U.S. Forest Service and after reviewing the curriculum of most forestry schools in the US, I find the focus of our science to be on what we can take from the forests rather than what is needed to keep our remaining forests healthy, vigorous and, above all else maintain or improve the diversity of the forest mosaic. I am suggesting intensive forest management that recognizes and manages the unique individual forest communities that make up our forests. I truly believe that diversity is the key to sustainability, balance and health of our remaining forests. Focusing our efforts on the needs of the remaining forested lands will provide the valuable natural resources from pour forests we have relied on for hundreds of years. Brian E. Stout
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How to measure the performance of forestry projects?

Best practice is needed for impact investing in sustainable forestry

98% of investors recognize the importance of standardized impact metrics for their investment decision making. However, to date non of such metrics adapted to the forestry context were available. Consequently, forestry is underrepresented as an asset class in large investment portfolios (Glauner 2011, p. 14) due to the absence of widely accepted forest valuation standards including performance assessment methods. Investors and loan officers feel impeded to allocate capital into this nontransparent market. High transaction cost for individual forest valuation and due diligences make investments unattractive. A low liquidity for immature forestry plantations in the secondary market further inhibits capital flow. To unleash more investments into the sustainable forestry sector, globally accepted standards need to be developed to measure, evaluate and report on the forest project performance. Decision makers on the high strategic level will then be enabled to evaluate forest investments more accurately. Best practice standards which measure the social, environmental and financial success will help to grow the credibility of the forestry investment sector.
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Building Bridges Between Impact Investors and Sustainable Forestry

The challenge

The annual worldwide deforestation is about 13 million hectares, predominantly in the tropics. We believe that reforestation is one opportunity to counter deforestation. At the same time it can help to satisfy the increasing demand for timber, which is estimated to grow by 50 percent by 2050.
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Workshop: forest investment business plan

Overview Online practice session with Q&A | start: 16.09.2013 | location: Impact Forestry Forum Introductory article on the workshop: What should a successful business plan look like? Download: forest investment plan Manual for using the forum Forum policy We recommend to start the workshop with reading the introductory article, which provides...

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What should a successful business plan look like?

Theory and experiences of writing a forest investment business plan for sustainable forestry projects

Talking about forest investment business plans is a wide field. In this introduction, we focus on general components of the business plan, like goals, presentation formats, content and information quality. Prepared with these background information we present and discuss a real business plan in the practice session. This more specific discussion takes place at the Impact Forestry Forum. Find the business plan for download at the end of this article.
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Facilitating private forestry investments: a practical approach to risk assessment

Severity and propability during for risk assessment This is the announcement of an article by Stefan Haas, Alexander Watson and Fabian Schmidt, which has been published by © 2012 ETFRN and Tropenbos International, Wageningen, the Netherlands in the Issue No. 54, December 2012: "Good Business Making Private Investments Work for Tropical Forests",

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Biological rationalization in forestry

Manage forests actively or let nature do the work?

Nature has optimized the collaboration between organisms over the past billion years. Why not use this experience in forestry? For the optimization of a sustainable management it is necessary to understand the dynamics of forest ecosystems. On this basis forest managers have to decide whether natural dynamics support the management goals or active management measures are required.
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Making Biochar out of Slash: Agroforestry Report from Guatemala

Application in practice: A guide on how to make biochar out of slash with low-tech methods instead of simply burning the slash. The biochar can be used to enhance soil quality and improve water retention during the dry season. Abstract: At the mixed hardwoods and cacao farm of Izabal Agro-Forest in Caribbean Guatemala, instead of burning in the traditional "slash-and-burn" manner, we made an experimental attempt on one hectare to convert into charcoal 10 years of clear-cut, successional, lowland tropical forest re-growth that had been felled to make way for mahogany and cacao planting. The resulting charcoal was to be incorporated into soil surrounding the cacao seedlings.
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Impact Investing for Sustainable Forestry (IISF)

This definition of “Impact Investing for Sustainable Forestry” is a first approach to formulate a vision of a strong sustainable forestry and an ethically responsible practice of investing in forestry. The definition is not complete, neither right nor false. It is a starting point for a journey on the trails of sustainability in forestry. The way is dynamic and should be discussed critically. We welcome every contribution and an active participation to further develop this definition and vision towards reality.
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